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Tyson is an underpaid writer, beer anarchist and cheese addict living in the North West of England.
If the people are buying tears, I'll be rich someday, Ma

Thursday, 9 January 2014

Blubber In Your Beer


A row worthy of our very own Brewdog has erupted over in Iceland with the news that brewer Brugghús Steðja (no, I don’t know how to pronounce it either) plan to market a beer containing whale meal. The 5.3% beer, brewed in conjunction with whaling company Hvalur, is being launched to coincide with the Icelandic mid-winter festival of Torrablst (Thorrablot) which is held in honour of everyone’s favourite Norse superhero, Thor.
The problem lies with using meat from the endangered fin whale for what opponents dismiss as a novelty item. The Whale and Dolphin Conservation group leader, Vanessa Williams-Grey said: ‘Demand for this meat is in decline, with fewer and fewer people eating it. ‘Even so, reducing a beautiful, sentient whale to an ingredient on the side of a beer bottle is about as immoral and outrageous as it is possible to get. The brewery may claim that this is just a novelty product with a short shelf life, but what price the life of an endangered whale which might have lived to be 90 years?’

The brewery, however, seems unperturbed by the furore surrounding the launch. Its owner, Dabjartur Arilmusson, stated: ‘This is a unique beer, brewed in collaboration with Hvalur. Whale beer will include, among other things, whale meal.’ Somewhat bizarrely he also claimed that it was a very healthy drink as whale fat is high in protein and very low in fat and the beer will contain no added sugar.  A little bit like normal beer, then?

So an ecological unfriendly beer or one that “people will be true Vikings drinking it”?

Written at Port Street Beer House
Drink: Magic Rock Ringmaster

1 comment:

RedNev said...

I've no interest in trying it. It seems like those novelty foods - exotic meats, bush tucker, etc - that some people like to eat to show how adventurous they are. Novelty, rather than Viking, would seem to be the most suitable description.