About Me

My photo
Manchester, United Kingdom
Tyson is a beer hound and cheese addict living in the beery metropolis paradise known as Manchester
If the people are buying tears, I'll be rich someday, Ma

Wednesday, 21 September 2011

Brewdog for Manchester

With terms now agreed, it’s time to reveal the location of Brewdog’s proposed Manchester outlet. Opening next spring, it’s on the junction of Dale St/Newton St and Port St. Yes, Port St. So, with its proximity to a certain Port Street Beer House, and with the Soup Kitchen also nearby, there’s potential for a good mini-crawl. It also rather exacerbates the fracture of the traditional N/4. With other new openings planned, it looks as though this side of Manchester is definitely on the up.

How will Mancunians take to the bad boys of "craft" brewing? How will all keg go down in a cask heartland? As always, the proof will be in the drinking.

13 comments:

Tandleman said...

Can't see you and I having a session in there can you? Might take the gloss of PSBH?

Tyson said...

Probably not. As for PSBH, I'm guessing they will start to feature Brewdog beers somewhat less. Although, it may be an idea to sell some cask Brewdog in order to give people the chance to compare and contrast the two.

Tandleman said...

It really annoys me this. The fuckers should sell cask where there is demand for it. This isn't Aberdeen or Glasgow. This is a cask city and their cask beers are good.

Sell them to us.

Barry said...

All sounds very exciting! Like your idea of PSBH selling cask Brewdog but it's unlikely.

Cooking Lager said...

It really annoys me this. The fuckers should sell cooking lager where there is demand for it. This isn't Aberdeen or Glasgow. This is a cooking lager city and their louts are good.

Sell them to us.

RedNev said...

What's an N/4 fracture?

Tyson said...

Nev

A fracture of the Northern Quarter: the area that traditionally extends from the Marble Arch down to Oldham St.

Tony said...

What happened to customer choice and the customer is always right? Not serving any real ale just seems perverse.

RedNev said...

As real ale sales in 2010 were 12% of all on-trade beer sales, I'm not sure where the indignation about BrewDog selling only keg comes from. I know Cooking Lager was taking the mick as usual, but regrettably he's more accurate than Tandleman and Tony, unless they're suggesting real ale outsells lager in Manchester.

(Source of stat: BBPA Statistical Handbook, via Curmudgeon).

Tyson said...

Nev

I think the point is that they could quite easily sell both. As a lot of places do. 12% of sales is just a statistic-it doesn’t tell the whole story. If everyone about to open a pub followed your thinking, then none would stock real ale. And yet it’s more widely available than it was 30 years ago.

It’s also an odd business strategy when you consider the nature of Brewdog. They are a pub-owning brewery. They produce award-winning cask ale. One presumes they wish to sell said product. So it does seem rather odd that they don’t offer it in their own pubs.

Penny said...

I’m not sure the 12% quoted is relevant. Surely, that’s just an external statistic? Every pub sells lager; not everywhere sells real ale. The question is how much real ale a pub that does offer it sells, how much it makes on it, and is it a viable option in this proposed development?

RedNev said...

Penny and Tyson: you both make good points, but I think you’ve slightly missed mine. The stat is relevant only to indicate that saying 'this is a cask city' is absurd when the predominant beer sold is lager. And if you argue the customer is always right, then lager it should be. As a real ale drinker, I don't want that (that is not 'my thinking' to use your phrase, Tyson), but real ale is a minority drink – even in Manchester - so neither TM's nor Tony's assertions that it's perverse to sell non-real beer in real ale city hold water. I think both of you should have addressed your points to them.

And Tyson, your comment that they could easily sell both applies to a lot of pubs that sell only smooth ale. And we all know Brewdog has it's own agenda, like the stunt when it tried to get keg beer into the GBBF.

Tony said...

Well it seems the very definition of perverse to me. Most pubs that don't sell real ale have no vested interest in doing so. On the other hand, a lot of pubs that do sell real do so because they have a pressing reason to do so. Hence Marstons and Fullers etc. That is the situation that Brewdog are in. Not to offer any real ale is most definitely perverse.