Breakfast Beer Tasting: To Øl Total Hubris

So today we start the day with a little number from those Danish wunderkinds To Øl. Now there is a very special reason for trying this particular beer this morning. Something very deep and meaningful no doubt, I hear you mutter. Absolutely. When I came home last night I had this in my pocket. Now I’m (fairly) certain I didn’t half-inch it, but what better way of disposing of the evidence if I did. Only joking, officer.
First things first. This is actually a collaboration with Swedish brewers Ølrepubliken. No I’ve never heard of them either. Only kidding. What I don’t know about Swedish brewers doesn’t need knowing. Ølrepubliken is in fact a well-respected craft beer bar/bistro in Gothenburg. To Øl, of course, are gypsy brewers and this beer, like a lot of their output, is actually brewed at De Proefbrouwerij in Belgium.

So it’s a 330ml bottle and the first thing that strikes you is the label design. No name (that is on the back) but merely a collection of seemingly random artwork clips. To Øl seem to have a thing for that sort of look. It’s officially a hoppy lager and is described as thus: “A Selfish, Never seen anything like this motherfucker, unique if it should say it self; brilliant hoppy lager created between the self-centered beeremperors: Danish To Øl and Swedish Ølrepubliken.”

It poured a light-ornage/amber with a lot of carbonation and a large two-finger off-white head. Initial aroma seemed classic lager profile but there is a lot going on here. A nice bread and malt mix more akin to a pale ale but complemented by a definite citrus edge with peach overtones. The first taste immediately pays dividends on its aromatic promise. A solid malt grain lager backbone is matched by a fistful of hops. The citrus hops come to the fore but the peach in the aroma is replaced by a pine resin and slightly floral edge. When that washes away you are left with a little granary bread on the tongue and a good amount of citric bitterness at the back of the throat.

Tyson says: Delivers on its promise: a hoppy lager. Very refreshing and moreish. 

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